11 March 2013

Iconic Stages Of New York City

New York is famous for its thriving creative community, and Broadway is considered by many to be the world’s theatrical Mecca. Many touring performers, theatrical productions and international musicians consider these New York stages the most glamorous and sought-after places to share their talents with an audience.

Radio City Music Hall

Radio City Music Hall
Situated in the glitzy Rockefeller Center, some call Radio City the showplace of the nation. It was for a time New York City’s leading tourist destination, and it was declared a city landmark in 1978. Although it was originally going to be called the International Music Hall, its name was changed to “Radio City Music Hall” because of one of the complex’s original tenants, The Radio Corporation of America.

Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden is a multi-purpose performance venue. It has been host to performances by a wide range of musicians and pop groups – such as Pearl Jam, pictured above performing in 2008, as well as to several high-profile sports events, like the NBA and NHL. Among the biggest names to perform on stage here are Elton John, Chuck Berry and, in his last concert appearance before his 1980 assassination, John Lennon. Many may also remember this stage as the site of the rematch between Clubber Lang and Rocky Balboa in the movie Rocky III.

The Apollo Theater

The Apollo Theatre
This Harlem landmark, which has played host to a wide range of African-American performers, was founded in the mid-19th century as a dance hall and ballroom, and converted into a theatre in 1872. Over the years, it fell into disrepair, was closed, and subsequently re-opened on two occasions. It was the Apollo Theater that launched the career of legendary songstress Ella Fitzgerald, who in 1934 performed there on an “Amateur Nights” evening and won $25.00. The Apollo is now owned by the state of New York and is visited by over a million people annually.

Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall
Built in Midtown Manhattan in 1891 by the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, Carnegie Hall is one of the world’s most prestigious venues for both classical and popular musicians. It’s one of New York’s last purely masonic buildings, built entirely out of stone with no steel frame. The Isaac Stern Auditorium, pictured above, contains the main stage and seats an audience of 2,804. From 1892 until 1962, Carnegie Hall was the home of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, which has since moved to the Avery Fisher Hall.

Avery Fisher Hall

Avery Fisher Hall
This concert hall was built in 1962 specifically as the home venue for the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, and was originally named “Philharmonic Hall”. It acquired its current name in honour of Avery Fisher, a member of the Philharmonic board who donated $10.5 million to the theatre, in 1973. It has since hosted performances by the likes of Queen and Simon and Garfunkel.
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This post was provided by travel blogger Jeff who writes over at http://www.thomascooktours.com/blog/. Thomas Cook Tours is a UK tour operator that offers a number of tours to the USA.

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